John Paczkowski

Recent Posts by John Paczkowski

Let Lonelygirl15 Go, Villain, or I’ll … Blind You With Neutrogena Rapid Clear™ Acne Eliminating Spot Gel

When Lonelygirl15 first entered the pop-culture consciousness in June 2006, ostensibly as a video blog by a perky but innocent 16-year-old girl named Bree, some wondered if it wasn’t actually an elaborate ad campaign for Target. After all, everything in her room seemed to have been purchased from the retailer.

Turned out, the video series was a fictional one put together by a coterie of filmmakers and backed by Creative Artists Agency. It wasn’t a front for a national advertising campaign, though.

At least not at the time. But by early the following year, Lonelygirl15 had begun shopping itself for product placements and managed to sell one to Hershey’s. And now the video series has gone a step further: It’s allowing Neutrogena to sponsor a new character. On Monday, a 22-year-old Neutrogena scientist will appear on the series to help its lead characters defeat an evil organization known as “the Order.” “This type of integration actually allows us to achieve even more reality for our show,” said Lonelygirl15 co-creator Greg Goodfried. “The most important thing is telling a compelling story. In this instance, the story line comes first and the fact that the new character works at Neutrogena heightens the reality.”

“Reality” here being stealth-marketing parlance for “our bottom line,” right Greg?


Twitter’s Tanking

December 30, 2013 at 6:49 am PT

2013 Was a Good Year for Chromebooks

December 29, 2013 at 2:12 pm PT

BlackBerry Pulls Latest Twitter for BB10 Update

December 29, 2013 at 5:58 am PT

Apple CEO Tim Cook Made $4.25 Million This Year

December 28, 2013 at 12:05 pm PT

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Just as the atom bomb was the weapon that was supposed to render war obsolete, the Internet seems like capitalism’s ultimate feat of self-destructive genius, an economic doomsday device rendering it impossible for anyone to ever make a profit off anything again. It’s especially hopeless for those whose work is easily digitized and accessed free of charge.

— Author Tim Kreider on not getting paid for one’s work