John Paczkowski

Recent Posts by John Paczkowski

I Smell the Work of Lord Voldem … I Mean 'He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named'

potterserver.jpgWhen the manuscript of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows”– the seventh and final novel in the Harry Potter series by JK Rowling–was carried by hand from London to New York, the attorney for Scholastic, the book’s American publisher, sat on it throughout the flight. When it was bound and printed, the factory workers who oversaw its production were reportedly forced to work in near-darkness to prevent them from reading it. And when it was shipped to retailers, the vehicles carrying it were tracked by satellite to ensure that they did not deviate from their intended route.

All this for naught. Because the book’s been leaked. And torrented. And uploaded to a number of image hosting sites as well–even as millions of preordered copies sit sealed in closely guarded boxes around the world.

Now granted, the leaked book is being distributed as a poor-quality scan–legible only if the reader possesses some rudimentary Photoshop skills and a lot of free time. Still, some $20 million was spent to prevent exactly this sort of thing from happening. And for what? Harry.Potter.and.the.Deathly.Hollows.Complete.jpg.screenshots.torrent? “We have a litigation specialist poised 24 hours a day, seven days a week to deal with any breaches,” a spokesman for the series’ British publisher, Bloomsbury, told the Telegraph last week. “It is our intention to enforce the embargo vigorously and seek an immediate injunction if required.”

Best get to work on that, guys.


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December 30, 2013 at 6:49 am PT

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December 29, 2013 at 2:12 pm PT

BlackBerry Pulls Latest Twitter for BB10 Update

December 29, 2013 at 5:58 am PT

Apple CEO Tim Cook Made $4.25 Million This Year

December 28, 2013 at 12:05 pm PT

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I think the NSA has a job to do and we need the NSA. But as (physicist) Robert Oppenheimer said, “When you see something that is technically sweet, you go ahead and do it and argue about what to do about it only after you’ve had your technical success. That is the way it was with the atomic bomb.”

— Phil Zimmerman, PGP inventor and Silent Circle co-founder, in an interview with Om Malik