John Paczkowski

Recent Posts by John Paczkowski

It Was a Bright Cold Day in April, and the Clocks Were Striking 13.

Well, look at that. AT&T’s actually figured out a way to turn the bad press over its cozy relationship with the National Security Agency into a product endorsement: offer a surveillance service to owners of small- and medium-size businesses.

Today the NSA-preferred telecom announced AT&T Remote Monitor, a package of IP video cameras and environmental sensors with which to surveil business locations and the employees who work in them. “It’s a unique and affordable option for a small business that wants to keep in touch with various locations,” Steve Loop, executive director for business development at AT&T, told the New York Times. “It saves them a lot of time in their day from having to physically go to all of their locations.”

Bet that’s exactly how the NSA felt when AT&T provided it with access to millions of email messages, Web-browsing sessions and phone calls. Anyway … AT&T’s touting the service as an easy way to monitor employees, customers and operations, which folks like restaurateur Beaux Roby says is a necessity. “It is Big Brother,” Roby said, “but in this day and age, you need these type of tools.”

And AT&T is, of course, ready and willing to provide them–whether it’s busting time-wasting employees, filtering the Internet for widespread copyright infringement or building that massive database of Americans’ phone calls.


Twitter’s Tanking

December 30, 2013 at 6:49 am PT

2013 Was a Good Year for Chromebooks

December 29, 2013 at 2:12 pm PT

BlackBerry Pulls Latest Twitter for BB10 Update

December 29, 2013 at 5:58 am PT

Apple CEO Tim Cook Made $4.25 Million This Year

December 28, 2013 at 12:05 pm PT

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The problem with the Billionaire Savior phase of the newspaper collapse has always been that billionaires don’t tend to like the kind of authority-questioning journalism that upsets the status quo.

— Ryan Chittum, writing in the Columbia Journalism Review about the promise of Pierre Omidyar’s new media venture with Glenn Greenwald