John Paczkowski

Recent Posts by John Paczkowski

Intel CEO: Atom's Da Bomb

otellinin_clean_suit.jpg Intel’s putting the mobile phone market on speed dial. Two years after selling off its chip business for mobile handhelds and cellphones to Marvell, the world’s largest chip-maker is turning its attention once again to the mobile phone market with dollar signs in its eyes. Seems the company can no longer tolerate the idea of ARM, and not Intel (INTC), inside many of the mobile phones on the market today.

In an interview with the Financial Times, Intel CEO Paul Otellini (pictured above) said he’s confident the company’s new Atom processor will expand Intel’s reach into the mobile phone market. “If you accept that the value proposition of the high end of the mobile-phone market is full Internet access that happens to have voice, my view is that it’s easier to add voice to a small computer than vice-versa,” Otellini told the FT, noting that the company’s expertise in PC chips will come in handy in making inroads into markets where devices are becoming increasingly more PC-like. Among them, those for televisions, ultra low-cost PCs, embedded controllers and, of course, smartphones. “We are bringing an element of computing into large markets, many of which are larger than the PC business, certainly in terms of units,” said Otellini. “Each of these four markets is a $10 billion opportunity by 2010 or 2011.”

Message to ARM: We’re coming for you.


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Just as the atom bomb was the weapon that was supposed to render war obsolete, the Internet seems like capitalism’s ultimate feat of self-destructive genius, an economic doomsday device rendering it impossible for anyone to ever make a profit off anything again. It’s especially hopeless for those whose work is easily digitized and accessed free of charge.

— Author Tim Kreider on not getting paid for one’s work