Kara Swisher

Recent Posts by Kara Swisher

Viral Video: Late-Night Debacle Makes for Good Jokes at Least (Plus BoomTown's Zucker Interview, Pre-Disaster)

jimmy-fallon_l

Although BoomTown completely enjoyed having dinner with entertainment agency overlord Ari Emanuel last week–hey, it was a Hollywood party at the Consumer Electronics Show, so name-dropping is required–I have little interest in the money and scheduling machinations that broke out last week over NBC Universal’s late-night television talk shows.

But I do love the roundelay of online videos this Tinseltown mess has created.

It all has to do with Jay Leno stinking up the joint in his newish 10 pm time slot, which has caused NBC affiliates to revolt, which–in turn–has sent broadcast network execs into a decided chicken-with-its-head-cut-off panic.

Thus, their big and cloddish idea to reschedule Leno back to late night, while trying to hipcheck Conan O’Brien from his 11:35 pm perch, all without incurring a big contract penalty fee. Jimmy Fallon, who comes on after O’Brien, is also part of the shovefest, as is after-Fallon host Carson Daly.

And, of course, all of them got to comment on all of this on–yes–the late-night comedy routines that open their shows.

Here are Leno and O’Brien riffing on the silly crisis–as well as ABC’s late-night host Jimmy Kimmel weighing in with Daly’s help–at the GE (GE) unit that was just bought by Comcast (CMCSA).

And below is an interview I did with NBC Universal President and CEO Jeff Zucker at the seventh D: All Things Digital conference last May talking about a range of topics, including what a brilliant idea it was going to be to move Leno to an earlier, five-night-a-week slot.

Not so much, Jeff!

But enjoy the ensuing videos:

LENO

O’BRIEN

KIMMEL/DALY

ZUCKER


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