Screens and Eyestrain

The launch of Apple Inc.’s (AAPL) iPad is fueling an ocular debate: What type of e-reader is easiest on the eyes: the black-and-white screens that simulate ink on a printed page or the back-lit color screens used by computers and the iPad?

The question isn’t just academic. A battle is under way to replace a 550-year-old invention called the printed book, and the winning technologies could have a big impact on everything from how students learn to the way people read a novel at the beach.

The two underlying screen technologies differ markedly. Many e-readers, including the Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN) Kindle, Sony Corp.’s (SNE) Reader and Barnes & Noble Inc.’s (BKS) Nook, use what’s called e-paper technology created by Cambridge, Mass.-based E Ink Corp. These screens use tiny capsules filled with charged black-and-white particles to give the appearance of ink on paper. As a result, they reflect light like ordinary paper, use no backlighting and are black and white only.

Read the rest of this post on the original site


Must-Reads from other Websites

Panos Mourdoukoutas

Why Apple Should Buy China’s Xiaomi

Paul Graham

What I Didn’t Say

Benjamin Bratton

We Need to Talk About TED

Mat Honan

I, Glasshole: My Year With Google Glass

Chris Ware

All Together Now

Corey S. Powell and Laurie Gwen Shapiro

The Sculpture on the Moon

About Voices

Along with original content and posts from across the Dow Jones network, this section of AllThingsD includes Must-Reads From Other Websites — pieces we’ve read, discussions we’ve followed, stuff we like. Six posts from external sites are included here each weekday, but we only run the headlines. We link to the original sites for the rest. These posts are explicitly labeled, so it’s clear that the content comes from other websites, and for clarity’s sake, all outside posts run against a pink background.

We also solicit original full-length posts and accept some unsolicited submissions.

Read more »