Looking to Make Mobile Browsing Better

It’s another sign that Internet companies are preparing for a more mobile world: Akamai (AKAM), a company that helps move much of the content on the Web to consumers, is buying a start-up that customizes Web sites for mobile devices.

Akamai is best known for storing content like video on its servers, which are located closer to households and can get the data to users more quickly. It is buying the 20-person start-up, called Velocitude, because many of the sites that use Akamai want their content to get to phones as well as PCs.

The Velocitude deal will allow Akamai to detect what type of phone a user is on and automatically configure the site to appear properly on that phone, said Tom Leighton, Akamai’s co-founder. Customized mobile versions of websites have been around for years, but Akamai says it will be able to combine this customization with its ability to speed delivery of data to allow for more complicated sites. The configuration can be vastly different from an ordinary site, making the browsing experience on the phone more like using an app.

Read the rest of this post on the original site


Must-Reads from other Websites

Panos Mourdoukoutas

Why Apple Should Buy China’s Xiaomi

Paul Graham

What I Didn’t Say

Benjamin Bratton

We Need to Talk About TED

Mat Honan

I, Glasshole: My Year With Google Glass

Chris Ware

All Together Now

Corey S. Powell and Laurie Gwen Shapiro

The Sculpture on the Moon

About Voices

Along with original content and posts from across the Dow Jones network, this section of AllThingsD includes Must-Reads From Other Websites — pieces we’ve read, discussions we’ve followed, stuff we like. Six posts from external sites are included here each weekday, but we only run the headlines. We link to the original sites for the rest. These posts are explicitly labeled, so it’s clear that the content comes from other websites, and for clarity’s sake, all outside posts run against a pink background.

We also solicit original full-length posts and accept some unsolicited submissions.

Read more »