South Korea Relaxes Curbs on Web Browsers

South Korea’s government is wiping out rules for Web browsing that trapped the country’s Internet users with 1990s-era security technology and created a de facto monopoly for Microsoft Corp.’s (MSFT) Internet Explorer here.

The South Korean rules had long stood in contrast to efforts by other governments around the world that have tried to break Microsoft’s grip on the Internet browser market. For South Koreans, they made Internet transactions a nuisance by requiring that users download plug-in programs, sometimes a dozen or so, for each website with which they did business.

Microsoft’s competitors, Internet security experts, website developers and advocates of open-source software and networks have long pushed for an end to South Korea’s rules.

The government finally took action when regulators realized the rules were preventing businesses from offering services to smartphones. As well, government antitrust officials say they want to flex their muscles over Microsoft’s dominance in Internet browsers in the same way they’ve seen their counterparts do in the U.S. and European Union.

Read the rest of this post on the original site


Must-Reads from other Websites

Panos Mourdoukoutas

Why Apple Should Buy China’s Xiaomi

Paul Graham

What I Didn’t Say

Benjamin Bratton

We Need to Talk About TED

Mat Honan

I, Glasshole: My Year With Google Glass

Chris Ware

All Together Now

Corey S. Powell and Laurie Gwen Shapiro

The Sculpture on the Moon

About Voices

Along with original content and posts from across the Dow Jones network, this section of AllThingsD includes Must-Reads From Other Websites — pieces we’ve read, discussions we’ve followed, stuff we like. Six posts from external sites are included here each weekday, but we only run the headlines. We link to the original sites for the rest. These posts are explicitly labeled, so it’s clear that the content comes from other websites, and for clarity’s sake, all outside posts run against a pink background.

We also solicit original full-length posts and accept some unsolicited submissions.

Read more »