Twitter Moves to Make it Easier to Tweet

Twitter borrowed a page from Facebook Thursday, announcing a plan to begin offering online publishers the chance to embed a “tweet” button on their sites. The goal is to make it easier for users of Twitter to share content–or tweet, in Twitter-speak.

More than 30 large sites including CNN.com, HuffingtonPost.com, and YouTube, the video website, today will begin making the tweet button available to users, Twitter announced.

Most major publishing sites already have buttons that allow Twitter and Facebook users to share content. But Facebook has upped the ante with its “like” button, which allows users to indicate to friends their approval of things like websites, news articles or videos. The “like” button effectively creates a direct link between Facebook and its users. By having computer code installed on thousands of sites across the web, Facebook can see which sites its users are visiting and how much time they spend there. The data gathered by Facebook could help the service better target ads to its users, among other things.

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