Kara Swisher

Recent Posts by Kara Swisher

Twitter's COO Dick Costolo Talks About Management, Monetization and IPO Cravings!

Yesterday, BoomTown headed to the well-appointed downtown San Francisco HQ of Twitter as part of a renewed quest that I have dubbed “Meet the Twits.”

No, really! Since Twitter has been on a significant hiring spree for all kinds of execs and staffers–it now has almost 250 employees–I have been in need of some serious meeting and greeting to see what’s going on there at the microblogging kingpin.

In fact, on my way to chat with COO Dick Costolo and Vice President of Engineering Michael Abbott–newly arrived from Palm and going full Ahab on the fail whale–I ran into former Google (GOOG) exec and spanking-new Twitter international head Katie Stanton and February-appointed CFO Ali Rowghani, formerly of Pixar.

It’s exec-mania over there!

Thus, the first place to start had to be a chit-chat with Costolo, who is about to have his one-year anniversary at Twitter as No. 2 to CEO and co-founder Evan Williams.

Costolo, as anyone who knows him well will tell you, is a very funny guy and also pretty forthright on what’s happening at Twitter.

He’d know, of course, as an early adviser and investor at the start-up–who came to Twitter rather suddenly after leaving Google, which had bought Costolo’s Feedburner.

Here’s the interview I did with Costolo, in which he talks about new execs, promoted tweets and trends, what’s next for the Silicon Valley darling and also the false, but funny, rumor of an IPO “craving” he has:

(You can also click here to see MediaMemo’s Peter Kafka’s video interview with Costolo in April about its ad business and his thoughts on Twitter’s third-party developers.)


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Just as the atom bomb was the weapon that was supposed to render war obsolete, the Internet seems like capitalism’s ultimate feat of self-destructive genius, an economic doomsday device rendering it impossible for anyone to ever make a profit off anything again. It’s especially hopeless for those whose work is easily digitized and accessed free of charge.

— Author Tim Kreider on not getting paid for one’s work