Toshiba Aims To Release Larger Glasses-Free 3-D TV

As Toshiba Corp. prepares to start selling the world’s first glasses-free 3-D televisions in Japan this week, the Japanese electronics and industrial conglomerate says it plans to go global with a larger model of over 40 inches in the coming fiscal year.

Head of Toshiba’s TV operations Masaaki Osumi said the new TV, due sometime in the coming fiscal year starting in April, may offer the option of watching 3-D with or without glasses. The company plans to reveal more details on the new glasses-free TV at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas in early January, he said.

Tokyo-based Toshiba continues to push ahead with glasses-free, or “autostereoscopic,” TV development even as the company and its competitors plow money into marketing 3-D televisions requiring glasses. Competitors have said the technology is still several years from being market-ready for TVs, but Toshiba’s efforts could deter consumers from switching to 3-D sets immediately, based on expectations for glasses-free models to come soon.

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