Ina Fried

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Samsung’s New Galaxy Player Aims Its Angry Bird at Apple’s iPod Touch

After having shipped nearly 10 million of its Galaxy S phones, Samsung is reportedly planning to try to take a page from Apple’s playbook with a “phoneless version.”

Like the iPod Touch, the new Galaxy Player is said to closely resemble its phone sibling. According to Samsung Hub, the YP-GB1 model will offer the same 1GHz processor as the phones as well as both front and rear-facing cameras, though it will not feature the high-end screens included on the Galaxy S phones.

Other specs, according to the site, include Android 2.2 (FroYo), Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 3.0, GPS, a microSD card slot, removable battery and access to both Samsung Apps and the Android Market.

The new Galaxy Player would not be the first Android-based media player (Archos and others have had models for some time, and Samsung itself has had other Galaxy Players). However, being based on a popular phone line, the new models could appeal to those who would like an Android device but are already committed to another phone or carrier contract.

Like Apple. Samsung appears to be shaving a few features off the device in hopes of not cannibalizing the phone line entirely. While the latest iPod Touch packs the iPhone’s Retina Display, it lacks the five-megapixel camera found on the iPhone. The new Galaxy Player meanwhile, has a full three-megapixel camera, but lacks the Super AMOLED screen found on the Galaxy S phones.

Samsung Hub says the device will be shown off at January’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. A Samsung representative was not immediately available for comment.


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Just as the atom bomb was the weapon that was supposed to render war obsolete, the Internet seems like capitalism’s ultimate feat of self-destructive genius, an economic doomsday device rendering it impossible for anyone to ever make a profit off anything again. It’s especially hopeless for those whose work is easily digitized and accessed free of charge.

— Author Tim Kreider on not getting paid for one’s work