Liz Gannes

Recent Posts by Liz Gannes

First Oscars Event for "The Social Network": Nominations

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on Tuesday will announce this year’s Oscar nominations, which are expected to include the Hollywood version of the founding of Facebook, “The Social Network.”

“The Social Network” racked up awards in earlier film competitions, but the Oscars of course are the big show. The Academy Awards ceremony is Feb. 27.

For those who want to watch along at home, the nominations Web cast starts at 5:30 am PT on Tuesday, with the contenders in the 10 big categories announced at 5:38.

“The Bachelor” host Chris Harrison, Entertainment Weekly’s Dave Karger, AMPAS boss Tom Sherak and 2010 Best Supporting Actress winner Mo’Nique have been commissioned to wake up early and make reading a list of names slightly more entertaining.

Tuesday’s live show is being put on by Livestream, ABC and the Academy. If you want to catch the big show later this month, you’ll have to tune into actual broadcast TV, though the Oscar Web site will have some red carpet and behind-the-scenes stuff.

“The Social Network” won best picture (drama), best director, screenplay and original score at this year’s Golden Globes, adding to a pile of film critics awards.

If you’re in the mood tomorrow to live stream something more serious (not that honoring a fictionalized version of Mark Zuckerberg’s college indiscretions is light fare), President Obama’s 2011 State of the Union address is Tuesday evening. Starting at 6 pm PT, Obama’s speech will play live on the White House Web site alongside charts, graphs and other content coordinated with the subject matter.

Embedded below is a placeholder that should include the Oscar nomination livestream when it starts. See you then!

Watch live streaming video from academyawards at livestream.com

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Update: The nominations are out, and “The Social Network” received eight, including best picture.


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The problem with the Billionaire Savior phase of the newspaper collapse has always been that billionaires don’t tend to like the kind of authority-questioning journalism that upsets the status quo.

— Ryan Chittum, writing in the Columbia Journalism Review about the promise of Pierre Omidyar’s new media venture with Glenn Greenwald