Kara Swisher

Recent Posts by Kara Swisher

BoomTown Will Have What Greg Coleman's Having: HuffPo Ad Sales Head Scores Big Bucks Twice From AOL's Armstrong

AOL CEO Tim Armstrong is the gift that keeps on giving–at least to Greg Coleman.

He’s the Chief Revenue Officer at the Huffington Post, for which the Internet giant just forked over $315 million to acquire.

Sources said Coleman, who has run advertising sales at the privately held news and opinion site since the fall of 2009, will get a multimillion dollar payday from the deal, even though he is not staying on after it closes, since AOL has its own top ad guy.

Except that this is the very same Greg Coleman who had been running ad sales for AOL for only two weeks when Armstrong took over from ousted CEO Randy Falco in February of 2009.

Coleman was gone from AOL by the end of April, replaced by Armstrong with current ad sales head Jeff Levick.

And for those three months of work Coleman got paid out his entire three-year AOL contract.

Not bad work if you can get it.

Actually, many credit Coleman’s energetic work at the Huffington Post for turbocharging its ad sales revenue to $31 million in 2010 and projected revenue upward of $60 million in 2011.

Coleman is an experienced online ad exec who was at Yahoo for seven years, responsible for all advertising revenue worldwide. He came to Yahoo from Reader’s Digest.

But Coleman ran into Yahoo’s management buzz saw after trouble hit the company in 2007. He was one of the first in a long line of execs to leave the troubled company, departing in one of its many controversial reorganizations.

But Yahoo’s ad business did grow strongly under him and former Yahoo ad exec Wenda Millard.

Before AOL, Coleman ran a Los Angeles-based start-up called NetSeer, which focused on ad targeting.

Memo to soon-to-be unemployed Greg: You’re definitely buying lunch next time I see you, and keep in mind that BoomTown is feeling partial to caviar.


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When AllThingsD began, we told readers we were aiming to present a fusion of new-media timeliness and energy with old-media standards for quality and ethics. And we hope you agree that we’ve done that.

— Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg, in their farewell D post