Microsoft Says 10 Million Kinect Sensors Sold for Xbox

Microsoft announced today that it had sold 10 million Kinect sensors for the Xbox just four months after it went on sale.

In addition, more than 10 million standalone Kinect games have been sold, the company said.

The Kinect allows players to use body motion to control the game, rather than the traditional controller.

While Microsoft calls the sales robust, it appears the pace is slowing.

In the lead up to the holidays, Microsoft sold eight million Kinect devices in the first 60 days. But in the following 60-day period, it sold only two million more.

Still, the 10 million-strong user base has the potential to breathe new life into the Xbox platform and broaden its audience beyond the hardcore gamers. Microsoft’s competition is no longer limited to Sony’s PlayStation or the Wii, but extends to Google TV and Apple TV.

According to Nielsen, game console owners are most likely to use the boxes first to play games and watch DVDs, but after that, entertainment services are a close third.

Video-on-demand and streaming services such as Netflix, MLB Network and ESPN3 account for 20 percent of Wii users’ time, 10 percent of Xbox 360 users’ time and 9 percent of PlayStation 3 users’ time.

Microsoft said starting this spring, consumers will be able to connect to Netflix and Hulu Plus using hand gestures and voice control. Also coming this year is Avatar Kinect, which was announced at the Consumer Electronics Show in January. With Kinect, you can control your avatar’s movement and expressions, so when you smile, frown, nod or speak, your avatar will do the same.

Of course, new game titles will give users new excuses to buy the Kinect. On April 12, Ubisoft will launch Michael Jackson: The Experience, which features the artist’s songs with dance moves, and many other titles are coming.


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I think the NSA has a job to do and we need the NSA. But as (physicist) Robert Oppenheimer said, “When you see something that is technically sweet, you go ahead and do it and argue about what to do about it only after you’ve had your technical success. That is the way it was with the atomic bomb.”

— Phil Zimmerman, PGP inventor and Silent Circle co-founder, in an interview with Om Malik