Angry Birds Expecting to Soar on Amazon Appstore

Rio, the new Angry Birds game developed in conjunction with Twentieth Century Fox, will debut exclusively on the Amazon Appstore.

The deal hints that Rovio, the developer of the insanely popular Angry Birds, is confident that Amazon can help monetize games on the Google platform.

When the Appstore launches, Rovio will also launch free and paid versions of Angry Birds and Angry Birds Seasons, which have already been out on the iPhone for some time.

With the launch of the paid applications on Amazon, it will mark the first time that Rovio has charged money for apps on the Android platform.

Android has notoriously been difficult to monetize because it relies primarily on Google’s own payment platform, which not all Android users have signed up for.

Amazon has not yet said when the Amazon Appstore will launch, only that it will be sometime soon. Over the past few months, it has been drumming up support among developers for the upcoming launch.

Developers are now hopeful that Amazon’s deep expertise in retail will help with discovery and monetization on the smartphone platform, which is rapidly gaining market share with 30 million users.

Rovio, which recently raised $42 million in capital, will have high expectations.

In all, it has been able to generate 100 million downloads across all mobile platforms.

Rio will feature the animated stars of the studio’s upcoming motion picture, “Rio.” In the game, the Angry Birds are kidnapped and taken to the city of Rio, where they have to escape their captors. The game will launch with 60 levels, and more will be available in following updates. The movie, which was created by the same people behind “Ice Age,” will debut worldwide April 15.

“The Android platform has seen phenomenal growth, and it’s great that new avenues for app distribution are opening up,” said Rovio’s CEO Mikael Hed in a release.


Latest Video

View all videos »

Search »

The problem with the Billionaire Savior phase of the newspaper collapse has always been that billionaires don’t tend to like the kind of authority-questioning journalism that upsets the status quo.

— Ryan Chittum, writing in the Columbia Journalism Review about the promise of Pierre Omidyar’s new media venture with Glenn Greenwald