Arik Hesseldahl

Recent Posts by Arik Hesseldahl

AMD Hires Its New CIO Away From Hewlett-Packard

Executives from Hewlett-Packard certainly seem to be in demand from other companies these days, and prospective poachers are clearly having better luck in their recruiting than others. On the same day that reports emerged that chipmaker Intel had unsuccessfully courted Todd Bradley, head of HP’s $41 billion personal systems group for a job that might have led to his being tapped as Paul Otellini’s successor, now we learn that Intel rival Advanced Micro Devices has hired its new CIO away from HP.

His name is Michael Wolfe. He’s 52 and has worked for HP for five years, most recently as VP for Information Technology. This will be his second go as a CIO. Before his stint at HP, he spent 24 years at Motorola’s Semiconductor Unit and was CIO during the period it was spun out to become Freescale Semiconductor.

His new boss, AMD’s interim CEO Thomas Seifert, had high praise. “Mike has effectively led IT transformations constantly focusing on reducing operating costs and significantly improving business innovation,” he said in a statement. “His considerable talent and experience will help AMD to continue strengthening our IT infrastructure and streamline our business based on our own products and platforms.”

This hiring is taking place against the backdrop of the complicated, difficult search for a new CEO at AMD following the surprise resignation of Dirk Meyer in January. COO Robert Rivet soon followed.

AMD shares haven’t moved much since then, and it has been the subject of recurring problematic buyout rumors. Today the shares closed at $8.55, unchanged from the prior session, and that’s up only a nickel from where it was at the start of the year. Shares fell five cents in after-hours trading. Investors seem to consider AMD a company in a holding pattern until there’s some resolution in the corner office.


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