Arik Hesseldahl

Recent Posts by Arik Hesseldahl

Sony Says Networks Will Be Back to Normal This Week, Except Where They Won’t

Still restoring its services after one of the biggest network attacks in history, Japanese electronics giant Sony said it will bring its PlayStation Network gaming service fully back online in the Americas, Europe and most of Asia (with the exception of Japan, Hong Kong and South Korea) by the end of this week. It said it will also restore service to its Qriocity music service for PlayStation3, PlayStation Portable, and PCs by the end of the week as well, again excepting Japan, South Korea and Hong Kong. Details for those countries are still undetermined.

As before, Sony says it has put in place “considerable security enhancements” to its network that should prevent the kind of attack that brought it down for nearly a month. Partial service was restored on May 15. The full restoration means that Sony customers will get back all the functions of the PlayStation store and will be able to make in-game purchases again, among other features.

The lingering damage from the attack continues to show. Sony’s shares are trading at the lowest levels seen since last July: They’re at $26.68 today, down 17 cents. The one thing Sony does have is a lot of cash. A Bloomberg story today speculates that Sony may join other Japanese companies making acquisitions of companies outside Japan in order to mitigate some of the financial damage it has suffered in recent years. Sony has reported losses for three years in a row, the first time that’s happened since the company’s shares debuted in 1958. It took a lot more than an attack on the PlayStation Network to do that kind of damage, but it certainly hasn’t helped.


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I think the NSA has a job to do and we need the NSA. But as (physicist) Robert Oppenheimer said, “When you see something that is technically sweet, you go ahead and do it and argue about what to do about it only after you’ve had your technical success. That is the way it was with the atomic bomb.”

— Phil Zimmerman, PGP inventor and Silent Circle co-founder, in an interview with Om Malik