Arik Hesseldahl

Recent Posts by Arik Hesseldahl

Omniture’s Former CEO: $10,000 Says You Can’t Guess My New Company’s Name

Remember how Josh James, the former CEO of Omniture, left Adobe to start a mysterious new company, for which he was found to be raising a boatload of venture capital money? Of course you do.

When we last looked in on his efforts to fund this new venture, James had raised $1 million from Andreessen Horowitz, and had also gotten a commitment from Ron Conway’s SV Angel, both as part of a seed round worth more than $5 million. On top of that, he’s already pretty far along in raising a Series A round, and Benchmark Capital had already committed up to $30 million.

Remember also that though he had acquired Corda Technologies, a company based in Lindon, Utah, near his home, he said that company was to be the basis for the new one, only with a much bigger vision? The thing is, he hadn’t decided on what to name the new venture.

Well now, he’s apparently decided on the name, but he’s just not ready to tell the world yet. Instead he’s going to let you guess. And there are clues. He’s announced on his personal blog a contest to work out the name, and to guess it you have to figure out a mathematical equation. A $10,000 prize goes to the first one with the answer, as explained in the fine print from James’s personal site. Send your answers to info@corda.com.

The $10,000 prize for solving the math equation and puzzle will only be awarded to one person, as determined at our sole discretion. The recipient will be the first person who we determine has found the answer key, signed a non-disclosure agreement, and then finished the equation and puzzle and demonstrated proof of his or her solution after obtaining the key.

Think you’ve got the brains to do it? Well here it is, smarty pants. Get to it. Or maybe, just maybe, there are some clues you can find in James’s recent video interview with AllThingsD’s Kara Swisher. Probably not, but it’s worth watching all the the same.


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Just as the atom bomb was the weapon that was supposed to render war obsolete, the Internet seems like capitalism’s ultimate feat of self-destructive genius, an economic doomsday device rendering it impossible for anyone to ever make a profit off anything again. It’s especially hopeless for those whose work is easily digitized and accessed free of charge.

— Author Tim Kreider on not getting paid for one’s work