Ina Fried

Recent Posts by Ina Fried

In Latest Wireless Patent Move, HTC Sues Apple in Delaware

In today’s episode of The (Wireless) People’s Court, HTC filed suit in Delaware against Apple, the latest round in their ongoing intellectual property spat.

HTC’s suit claims that a range of Apple products infringe on three of its patents, including iPods, iPhones, iPads and Macs, according to Reuters.

Neither Apple nor HTC representatives were immediately available for comment.

It’s the latest move in a continuing spat between the Taiwanese cellphone maker and Apple. Apple first sued HTC back in March of last year, accusing HTC of infringing on 20 of its patents.

The U.S. International Trade Commission last month found that HTC is infringing on two of Apple’s patents.

Though HTC is the company named on Apple’s court documents, it is clear Apple also has all of Android in its crosshairs, with many of its complaints related to the way Google’s operating system works.

HTC, being a younger company than other vendors like Samsung and Motorola, however, has had less in the patent realm to defend itself. The company recently scooped up graphics chipmaker S3 from Via, in large part to gain that company’s patent holdings. The company has also suggested it is open to some sort of deal with Apple.

And of course, in the granddaddy of patent-related acquisitions, Google announced on Monday it plans to spend $12.5 billion to acquire Motorola Mobility.

The Apple-HTC spat is just one of many patent fights taking place in the wireless industry. Apple is also suing Samsung, while Microsoft is engaged in legal fights with Motorola and Barnes & Noble, and Oracle is suing Google.

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Just as the atom bomb was the weapon that was supposed to render war obsolete, the Internet seems like capitalism’s ultimate feat of self-destructive genius, an economic doomsday device rendering it impossible for anyone to ever make a profit off anything again. It’s especially hopeless for those whose work is easily digitized and accessed free of charge.

— Author Tim Kreider on not getting paid for one’s work