Gaia Moves Games From Online to Facebook

Gaia Interactive, which developed one of the early online gaming communities, is participating in one of the most recent trends: Making its games available to users at all times, on most any platform.

Today Gaia announced the availability of its first game on the iPhone, a spinoff from the Facebook game Monster Galaxy, which is played by more than 15 million users a month.

The game is called Monster Galaxy: The Zodiac Islands, and is available for free, starting today.

Mike Sego, Gaia’s CEO, said the most-requested feature by its Facebook players was to play the game on a mobile phone.

Despite that, Sego said the game is a standalone experience, meaning that it is not tied to the Facebook game. “It is an entirely different game — we didn’t want it to be limited to the people who played on Facebook,” he said.

In the game, players must battle magical creatures while crossing the mystical islands in an attempt to dethrone an evil king. Gamers will be able to accelerate the time it takes to complete missions, if they purchase in-game virtual goods.

GaiaOnline was launched in 2003 as a social gaming community focused on giving players a platform to dress up avatars, share their interests and play games. Originally, the site added a PayPal link, where fans could give donations to the developers to keep the community going. Since then the community and the payment mechanisms have evolved a lot.

As for whether Gaia will continue moving to other platforms, like Google+ or a game console, Sego said, “It’s not something we have ruled out. The Monster Galaxy brand has a durable emotional connection with a large audience.”


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