Liz Gannes

Recent Posts by Liz Gannes

New Delicious Buys Competitor That Disparaged Its Redesign

Criticizing your famous deep-pocketed competitors is usually just a way to get attention. But for Trunk.ly, a self-promoting blog post critique of the YouTube co-founders’ recent revamp of Delicious turned out to be pretty lucrative.

That’s because AVOS today announced it is buying Trunk.ly “to accelerate link-saving and searching capabilities in Delicious,” said AVOS CEO Chad Hurley.

Trunk.ly is a two-man Australian social bookmarking start-up that earlier this fall flagged AVOS’ relaunched Delicious as “one step forward, two steps back.” (They weren’t the only ones being critical; many users were up in arms about lost features and underwhelming new stuff after AVOS took Delicious over from Yahoo.)

Trunk.ly, which was founded just under a year ago, will be shut down over the next two months and its co-founders will apply their know-how to Delicious.

Here’s the relevant portion of the critical blog post from September by Trunk.ly’s Alex Dong:

Two steps back

1) The main way to get links into delicious is still via bookmarklet. Given the high ratio of people using facebook and twitter, why should I manually bookmark a link if I have already retweeted it? Or liked it in my little walled garden?

Trunk.ly provides 10+ connectors into popular social networks. Setup once and links will start coming in automatically.

2) Lack of a solid social search. The playlist for the web is a great concept but will your interior “design” tag mean the same as my software “design” tag? Tagging as a device to build a taxonomy starts to collapse when people use same tag for different things. Quora solves this problem quite well by labouring out a taxonomy of its own.

Trunk.ly provides a search interface so essentially you have your own google for your links as well as your friends. There’s no need to tag – you can if you want, but you don’t have to in order to create value.


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Just as the atom bomb was the weapon that was supposed to render war obsolete, the Internet seems like capitalism’s ultimate feat of self-destructive genius, an economic doomsday device rendering it impossible for anyone to ever make a profit off anything again. It’s especially hopeless for those whose work is easily digitized and accessed free of charge.

— Author Tim Kreider on not getting paid for one’s work