Groupon CEO Andrew “Wolverine” Mason Defends His Decisions on “60 Minutes”

Groupon CEO Andrew Mason said there’s things he would have liked to do differently and would have liked to have avoided, but that he’s mostly done a good job leading the rocket ship of a company.

In a piece by Lesley Stahl of CBS news show “60 Minutes,” she interviewed the leader of the Chicago-based social buying company in his first national appearance since the company’s initial public offering.

Of course, Stahl asked hard-hitting questions about the fishy revenue figures and the questionable accounting practices that preceded the IPO.

And, because it is “wacky” Groupon, she also questioned the appropriateness of a CEO who has a video of himself practicing yoga in tighty whities in front of a Christmas tree on YouTube.

Mason, who was often grinning during the interview, tried hard not to come off as defensive.

“The difference between me and other CEOs is that I’ve been unwilling to change myself or shape myself around what’s expected,” said the 31-year-old founder. “Am I as experienced or as mature or smart as other CEOs. No probably not, but there’s something useful about having the founder as a CEO.”

At one point, he acknowledged it wasn’t enjoyable when the criticism was peaking and the company was in its quiet period. He likened the experience to the Wolverine’s skin being melted off.

Stahl had no idea what he was talking about.

Did he wear a tie? Nope. But he thinks he should get credit for asking the producers if it was necessary. Is that a sign the boss is growing up? Maybe.

For the record, he does own more than four.

All-in-all, Mason worked hard not to say anything too revealing.

Here’s the whole interview:


And, here’s Stahl comparing Mason to other tech CEOs she’s interviewed:


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