Arik Hesseldahl

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HP Confirms Printer and PC Combination, Creates New Enterprise Group

Hewlett-Packard just confirmed what AllThingsD reported exclusively yesterday: Its printer and PC divisions will be combined into a single massive business unit, reporting to Executive Vice President Todd Bradley. The company also confirmed that Vyomesh Joshi, the well-known head of the printer group, will be retiring after 31 years with the company.

The reorganization appears to be bigger than we reported. There are a few other things, aside from the combination of the PC-making Personal Systems Group and the printer-making Imaging and Printing Group. One of them is a biggie: If I’m reading this right, then the $22 billion Enterprise Storage and Networking Group appears to have been renamed the HP Enterprise Group, and it appears that the $36 billion Services Group just got combined under Dave Donatelli. That is about as equally important a strategic shift as the other combination.

Update: Not quite so big, after all: HP just called to clarify that only Technology Services is being added to the Enterprise Group, not the Enterprise Services Group run by John Visentin. Sorry for that bit of confusion.

In another move, Global Sales will report to Donatelli, and will be combined into the Enterprise Group. And it looks like Jan Zadak, who had been on the rise since being promoted under Léo Apotheker last year to head Enterprise Sales, is going to get a “new role.”

So now we know what CEO Meg Whitman meant when she said she wanted to streamline and simplify HP’s operations. Operationally, she has created what appears to be one really huge organization in PSG ($65 billion in 2011 and flatlining) and to increase the size of the newly created Enterprise Group a bit by adding to it Technology Services and Global Sales. It’s hard to determine what the combined size of the organization is by revenue, because HP doesn’t break out sales for Technology Services.

Software appears to have been left alone in this shakeup, for now. That group is run by Bill Veghte, who was recently promoted to chief strategy officer, while another software operation, the Information Management Group, which combines Autonomy, the British software firm for which HP paid $12 billion last year and Vertica. It is run by Mike Lynch, the former Autonomy CEO.

Marketing functions have been unified under Marty Homlish, while communications have been unified under Henry Gomez.

Here’s the press release:

HP Announces Organizational Realignment

PALO ALTO, CA — (Marketwire -03/21/12) — HP (NYSE: HPQ – News) today announced an organizational realignment to improve performance and drive profitable growth across the entire HP portfolio.

As part of this realignment, HP’s Imaging and Printing Group (IPG) and its Personal Systems Group (PSG) are joining forces to create the Printing and Personal Systems Group. The combined entity will be led by Todd Bradley, who has served as the executive vice president of PSG since 2005.

Vyomesh Joshi, executive vice president of IPG, is retiring after a highly accomplished 31-year career at HP. Under Joshi’s leadership, IPG has grown revenue from $19 billion to $26 billion, and doubled its operating profit to approximately $4 billion.

“VJ embodies the spirit of HP and his impact on the company has been tremendous,” said Meg Whitman, president and chief executive officer, HP. “Under his leadership, IPG accelerated innovation and pioneered solutions that transformed the printing market. We wish him the very best as he embarks on a new chapter in his life.”

Combining these two entities will rationalize HP’s go-to-market strategy, branding, supply chain and customer support worldwide. This will lead to a better customer experience and drive innovation across personal computing and printing. This realignment is expected to provide opportunities for cost savings and accelerate HP’s ability to pursue profitable growth and reinvest in the business.

“This combination will bring together two businesses where HP has established global leadership,” said Whitman. “By providing the best in customer-focused innovation and operational efficiency, we believe we will create a winning scenario for customers, partners and shareholders.”

In addition to combining PSG and IPG, HP also is taking steps to unify and streamline certain key business functions.

The Global Accounts Sales organization will join the newly named HP Enterprise Group. This group will be led by David Donatelli and includes Enterprise Servers, Storage, Networking and Technology Services.

The new structure is expected to speed decision making, increase productivity and improve efficiency, while providing a simplified customer experience. A new role for Jan Zadak, executive vice president for Global Sales, will be announced at a later date. Zadak will work with Donatelli to ensure an orderly transition.

HP also announced that it will unify its Marketing functions across business units under Marty Homlish, executive vice president and chief marketing officer, HP. This will allow for even more effective brand-building and marketing activities, and will create efficiencies across the business units.

HP’s Communications employees worldwide also will be similarly unified under Henry Gomez, executive vice president and chief communications officer, HP. Together these two moves will create a more powerful voice to demonstrate the power of “One HP.”

Finally, HP is moving the Global Real Estate function from Finance into Global Technology and Business Processes to address real estate consolidation and improve the workplace experience for HP employees.

“Ensuring we have the right organizational structure in place is a critical first step in driving improved execution, and increasing effectiveness and efficiency,” added Whitman. “The result will be a faster, more streamlined, performance-driven HP that is customer focused and poised to capitalize on rapidly shifting industry trends.”


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The problem with the Billionaire Savior phase of the newspaper collapse has always been that billionaires don’t tend to like the kind of authority-questioning journalism that upsets the status quo.

— Ryan Chittum, writing in the Columbia Journalism Review about the promise of Pierre Omidyar’s new media venture with Glenn Greenwald