Is Your New iPad Fibbing About Whether It Is Fully Charged?

There is no question that the new iPad battery is bigger and, as a result, can take longer to recharge than its predecessor.

However, one analyst says that his testing shows that it may take longer to fully charge than the iPad indicates. DisplayMate’s Ray Soneira said last week that the iPad continues to charge well after the device shows 100 percent.

In follow-up testing, Soneira said that the iPad is only about 90 percent charged when it first indicates it is fully powered up. The iPad, Soneira said, will run more than an hour longer, if left to fully charge.

AllThingsD’s Walt Mossberg noted in his review that the new iPad delivers on its impressive claim of 10-hour battery life, starting when the tablet’s indicator said it was 100 percent charged.

Soneira plans to offer full details of his findings in an updated report on Monday.

Apple representatives were not immediately available for comment.

10 comments
Phil Turnbull
Phil Turnbull

That is a feature of almost all (non-exploding) lithium ion batteries, otherwise when the battery is full (and resistance increases) the excess energy gets converted to heat. As an additional safety feature, when the battery is almost full the charging current drops to trickle mode. 

JHankwitz
JHankwitz

This is such a non-issue.  How many people watch their meter while it's charging and disconnect it when it reads 100%?  I'd wager that most people simply plug it in overnight, and it's fully charged when they get up in the morning.

Besides, if it's 100% charged or not, it's not telling you how long the charge will last since that depends on how it's being used (gaming, web surfing, book reading, HD movie watching, etc.)   The only thing the % meter should be used for is to determine if you want to plug it in or not.

Daniel
Daniel

If I pull my phone from the power supply when it tells me it's charged, I get about 1 day of battery life. On the other hand, if I leave it to charge over night then I will get two days of battery life.

Leaving it to charge more is actually recommended, and leaving it to charge while turned off is also a good idea to get more charging cycles out of the battery. I charge my gadgets turned off at least once every month..and I have no problems with them.

Phil Turnbull
Phil Turnbull

Electricity is electricity - it doesn't ripen or become better with time. Li-Ion batteries do perform better when they are kept above a minimum level (ie never run flat) however, but I suspect most of your findings could be explained by confirmation bias. 

axoniclabs
axoniclabs

I hope the test for the "extra charging time" was done with the iPad completely off and not just in standby. Email, iCloud backup and other activities could be drawing power even with the battery at 100%.

mrrross
mrrross

I hate how apple modifies indicators.  if it's 85% after X hours let it display 85% and communicate to users 85% will last X hours.  If it really takes X+2 hours to reach 100% charge document it.  It reminds me of the whole 3G bar debacle on iphone 3G.  Real engineers would not indicate 100% charged at some other capacity number other than fully charged.

Phil Turnbull
Phil Turnbull

As the article suggests, that would be confusing for a non-tech user despite it being technically correct. If I charge for 3 hours = 100%, 4 hours = 85% ,5 hours 93% etc. 

tweisbach
tweisbach

Did you examine Apple's battery indicator code to come to your conclusions?

dMcCool
dMcCool

Then again, you don't own Apple stock or Apple products, so you happy to dis them every chance you get.

mrrross
mrrross

Pretty presumptuous, you have no idea how many apple products I have in my house, nor my stock ownership standing.  

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