Bonnie Cha

Recent Posts by Bonnie Cha

Acer Aspire S5, “World’s Thinnest” Ultrabook, Launching in Late June

Introduced back in January at CES 2012, Acer announced today that its Aspire S5, the “world’s thinnest” Ultrabook, will finally be available in the U.S. for $1,400, starting the last week of June.

Though it feels as though tech companies claim they have the “world’s thinnest” this or that every other week, the Aspire S5 is incredibly slim, measuring just 0.59 of an inch at its thickest point.

The MacBook Air comes in at 0.68-inch thick, and the Fujitsu Lifebook UH75H, which the company also claims is the world’s thinnest Ultrabook, is 0.61-inch thick.

Made from magnesium alloy, the Aspire S5 is also lightweight, at 2.65 pounds, and offers a 13.3-inch, 1366 x 768 pixel display.

Acer was able to achieve such a streamlined design by tucking away the Ultrabook’s various ports (HDMI, USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt) just below the hinge, in a hideaway panel it calls MagicFlip I/O. Whenever you need access to the ports, you can press the dedicated MagicFlip key, and the panel will pop open.

The Aspire S5 is also Acer’s first product in the U.S. to ship with its AcerCloud service, which gives users access to the data on their Ultrabook from an Android smartphone or tablet.

At $1,400, it’s not cheap, putting it in the same category as the HP Envy Spectre 14. The S5 comes with Intel’s latest Core i7 Ivy Bridge processor and a 256 gigabyte solid-state drive, as well as a 1.3-megapixel Webcam and up to 6.5 hours of battery life.

The Aspire S5 will be available for purchase from Acer’s online store and major electronics retailers nationwide.


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I think the NSA has a job to do and we need the NSA. But as (physicist) Robert Oppenheimer said, “When you see something that is technically sweet, you go ahead and do it and argue about what to do about it only after you’ve had your technical success. That is the way it was with the atomic bomb.”

— Phil Zimmerman, PGP inventor and Silent Circle co-founder, in an interview with Om Malik