Kara Swisher

Recent Posts by Kara Swisher

Freedom of Tweet: Rupert Murdoch Continues to Light Up Twitter With Jibes

All his drastic corporate rejiggering and continued phone-hacking controversies do not seem to have stopped News Corp.’s Rupert Murdoch from continuing to tweet up a storm.

And by storm, I mean some pretty controversial Twitter tornadoes of late. It’s highly unusual for a sitting CEO, since many well-known people arrive on Twitter with a lot of noisy sparkle and then follow with hardly a whimper.

But Murdoch, who first appeared on the communications service in January, remains very active and pot-stirring.

Previously, targets were Google and President Barack Obama, but Murdoch recently added more to his digital target practice.

On Saturday, July 1, particularly — he appears to go wild once every week or so, mostly on weekends — the media mogul took aim at Tom Cruise’s divorce and Scientology, as well as Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s campaign performance and his favored punching bag, the New York Times, as you can see below:

First, a smack upside the head to the NYT:

Then, a slap attack at Scientology:

Now it’s time to deliver a fresh one to Mittens, whom Murdoch has recently been ragging on relentlessly on Twitter:

And, back to the doomed TomKat:

Finally, not backing down, more on the creepy-evils:

Things calmed down by Sunday, with decidedly more sage civic advice:

In Murdoch’s case, perhaps a plug for the Constitution would be more apt, what with the freedom of tweet — oops, speech — part.

(Full disclosure: Murdoch essentially owns this Web site, but so far has not aimed his Twitter arrows at us. Yet!)


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Just as the atom bomb was the weapon that was supposed to render war obsolete, the Internet seems like capitalism’s ultimate feat of self-destructive genius, an economic doomsday device rendering it impossible for anyone to ever make a profit off anything again. It’s especially hopeless for those whose work is easily digitized and accessed free of charge.

— Author Tim Kreider on not getting paid for one’s work