Ina Fried

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Samsung, Apple Reveal Names of Those Who May Testify at Next Week’s Trial

With Apple and Samsung set to go to trial in a key patent dispute next week, both sides are furiously filing documents with the court, offering more insight into their legal strategy.

Among the host of documents that have arrived in the last 24 hours are the set of witnesses that each side says it may call in the trial.

Apple’s list includes iOS chief Scott Forstall and marketing SVP Phil Schiller, operations exec Tony Blevins, and director of patents and licensing Boris Teksler. Other notable names include Samsung’s Justin Denison and early Apple employee and designer Susan Kare.

Others named are: Ravin Balakrishnan, Peter Bressler, Richard Donaldson, computer scientist Paul Dourish, Tony Givargis, Hyong Kim, Ed Knightly, Terry Musika, Janusz Ordover, Karan Singh, Mani Srivastava, Chris Stringer, Michael Walker and Russell Winer.

Samsung, meanwhile, says it may call Hyoung Shin Park, an employee, to testify regarding the company’s design efforts, as well as a few other Samsung workers. Also listed are Apple employees Steve Sinclair and Richard Howarth, along with Intel’s Marcus Paltian and a host of expert witnesses.

That list includes: Robert John Anders, Clifton Forlines, Adam Bogue and
Benjamin Bederson.

The witness lists are just two of more than a dozen filings that have come in, documents that include all sorts of allegations back and forth as well as arguments about why various points should not be allowed to be made to the jury.

Apple is saying that Samsung was fully aware that its designs were copying Apple, while Samsung says the iPhone itself borrows from Sony’s designs.

It’s enough to keep an army of lawyers (and reporters) working through the weekend.

AllThingsD’s John Paczkowski contributed to this report.


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