John Paczkowski

Recent Posts by John Paczkowski

Android Cedes Ground to iOS in U.S. Smartphone Market

Google’s Android mobile operating system still owns more than half the U.S. smartphone market, but it’s beginning to lose ground to Apple’s iOS.

New research from Strategy Analytics reveals that Android’s U.S. market share declined during the second quarter, and iOS’s share grew. For the three-month period ended in June, Android captured 56 percent of the U.S. smartphone market, down from 61 percent a year ago. Meanwhile, Android handset shipments fell to 13.4 million from 15.3 million.

At the same time, the iPhone’s share of the U.S. smartphone market rose to 33 percent from 23 percent a year ago. And iPhone shipments in the country surged to 7.9 million from 5.9 million during the same period.

So, while Android remains the most popular smartphone OS in the States by a wide margin, it does seem to be slipping. It’s worth noting that overall smartphone shipments in the U.S. fell 5 percent year on year to reach 23.8 million units, and Android’s market share decline this quarter was clearly a function of that. That said, iOS’s share increased 10 percent during the same period of contraction. So there’s likely something more behind Android’s slip than just slowing smartphone growth rates. It will certainly be interesting to take a look at Strategy Analytics’s third-quarter survey.

One last point to note here: Research In Motion’s BlackBerry OS continues to suffer significant market share losses in the U.S. BlackBerry’s smartphone market share in the U.S. fell to 6.5 percent in the second quarter from 10.5 percent in the same period a year ago.


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The problem with the Billionaire Savior phase of the newspaper collapse has always been that billionaires don’t tend to like the kind of authority-questioning journalism that upsets the status quo.

— Ryan Chittum, writing in the Columbia Journalism Review about the promise of Pierre Omidyar’s new media venture with Glenn Greenwald