Peter Kafka

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Mahalo President Jason Rapp Exits

Mahalo President Jason Rapp, who joined the instructional app maker two years ago, is leaving the company.

In a company-wide email (see below), Rapp doesn’t say where he’s headed next, but says he’ll stay on as a Mahalo board adviser.

Mahalo founder and CEO Jason Calacanis first launched his site as a “human-powered search engine” in 2007, and has since pivoted a few times. Most recently, he’s moved the company’s focus from making how-to Web videos to apps for Apple’s iOS platform.

Prior to Mahalo, Rapp worked at IAC and the New York Times.

Here’s Rapp’s memo.

Team,

I’m writing to let you know that I’ll be leaving day-to-day operations at Mahalo. (I’ll remain a board advisor and significant shareholder, so I won’t be too far away.)

I joined two years ago to help my friend Jason Calacanis turn his business around; and with your help we most definitely have. Consider the evidence: over 30 apps in the store, 1.4 million installs, 25 million monthly video views and a 9-show YouTube deal — that plus a killer team of engineers, designers and video preditors prove we are well on our way to re-inventing educational and instructional content. Or in other words, changing peoples lives. I’m super proud of your accomplishments, not to mention a bit sore after completing my first 6 XFitDaily workouts.

The company has never had a clearer path or brighter future (plus a new name!) and for that reason it’s the perfect time for me to step back and pursue my next adventure.

Keep pouring passion into your work — it shows. (I read our customer feedback everyday and so should you. When we do great work it makes a difference in people’s lives.)

Mahalo and see you Inside,
Jason


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Just as the atom bomb was the weapon that was supposed to render war obsolete, the Internet seems like capitalism’s ultimate feat of self-destructive genius, an economic doomsday device rendering it impossible for anyone to ever make a profit off anything again. It’s especially hopeless for those whose work is easily digitized and accessed free of charge.

— Author Tim Kreider on not getting paid for one’s work