Liz Gannes

Recent Posts by Liz Gannes

Location App Quadstreaker Turns the World Into a Game Board

“I think the most compelling board game is the real world,” says Quadstreaker founder Scott Kendall.

QuadstreakerIf Kendall has his way, drunk college students — and drunk college nostalgists like Will Ferrell’s character from “Old School” — won’t be the only ones who go “streaking in the quad.”

Quadstreaker is a location app based not around nudity (though levels in the game are called “bare,” “undercover,” “commando,” etc.), but around connecting real-world “streaks” by physically visiting square areas on a map grid.

The point is to go lots of places in order to fill in your own world map and compete against friends.

An iPhone app made by a bootstrapped five-person startup from Seattle, Quadstreaker runs passively in the background, monitoring location at all times while trying not to draw on the battery too much (similar to the Moves activity tracker and social discovery app Highlight).

Unlike Foursquare, Quadstreaker doesn’t map the world by venues, but rather by these “quads” of location. And it’s a game, where each player’s tracked travels to date are displayed on a shareable “Lifeboard.” (But the location-based gameplay is nothing as complicated as Google’s Ingress.)

“I’ve designed Quadstreaker for me and people like me: Explorer-achievers who like maps, collecting — and a sense of completion,” Kendall explained.

Here’s Will Ferrell’s “We’re going streaking through the quad!” bit:

And here’s a demo video of the Quadstreaker app:

introducing quadstreaker from quadstreaker on Vimeo.


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Just as the atom bomb was the weapon that was supposed to render war obsolete, the Internet seems like capitalism’s ultimate feat of self-destructive genius, an economic doomsday device rendering it impossible for anyone to ever make a profit off anything again. It’s especially hopeless for those whose work is easily digitized and accessed free of charge.

— Author Tim Kreider on not getting paid for one’s work