Mitchell Baker

Chairman
Mozilla

As the leader of the Mozilla Project, Baker has been responsible for organizing and motivating a massive, worldwide collective of employees and volunteers who are behind the open-source Firefox Web browser. Baker has been general manager of the Mozilla project since 1999, helping shape the license under which Netscape's source code was released. In 2003, she became president and founder of the Mozilla Foundation, and in 2005, she led the creation of Mozilla Corp. Though a lawyer by training, she is obviously a geek.

Posts With Mitchell Baker

Exclusive: Mozilla CEO John Lilly to Step Down and Head to Greylock (Plus Departure Email!)

John Lilly, the well-regarded CEO of Mozilla, is preparing to give up his post at the open-source software nonprofit foundation, which is also a for-profit start-up. Lilly is moving to Greylock Partners as a venture partner, sources added, although the affable entrepreneur could eventually end up doing a start-up. While Mozilla makes a number of products, it is best known for its Firefox browser, whose share has steadily increased since it debuted in late 2004.

Mozilla Chairman Mitchell Baker and CEO John Lilly: The Full D7 Session

As CEO and chairman of Mozilla, respectively, John Lilly and Mitchell Baker have overseen the huge growth of Firefox, the popular open-source browser. The pair talk about this and more in an interview with Walt Mossberg at the seventh D: All Things Digital conference.
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Mozilla Foundation Announces Your New Default Browser

After four beta versions and nearly as many release candidates, Firefox 3.5 is finally here. This latest version of the browser offers a number of new features. Among them: Private browsing, location aware surfing, support for emerging HTML 5 standards such as plug-in-free video and audio playing, and better JavaScript performance.
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Microsoft's Browser Move to Make Windows Even More Annoying

Microsoft’s proposal to remove Internet Explorer from Windows 7 in Europe may put the company in compliance with European law, but it’s not going to lead to better competition in the browser market. That’s the word from Microsoft’s rivals at home and abroad who say the “must-carry” provision the European Commission has been mulling as a solution to the company’s antitrust indiscretions is the only one that will work.
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D7: The Conference in Quotes

Like last year’s D6 conference, this year’s D7 has had its share of memorable lines. Here’s a selection of some of the better ones, including this quip from Yahoo CEO Carol Bartz: “You can’t take nine women and make a baby in the month; there is a process.”
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D7 Video Highlights: Mitchell Baker and John Lilly of Mozilla

Walt Mossberg interviews Mitchell Baker and John Lilly at D7 about Mozilla, Google Chrome, Internet Explorer and the state of the modern browser wars.
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Mozilla: In the Shadow of the “Don’t-Be-Evil Bulldozer”

As CEO and chairman of Mozilla, respectively, John Lilly and Mitchell Baker steward the development of Firefox, the open-source browser that challenged and then broke Microsoft’s choke hold on the browser market. As of April 2009, Firefox claimed 22.48 percent of Web browser market, according to Net Applications. That makes it the second most popular browser world-wide, after Internet Explorer, which holds 66.1 percent. An impressive feat. And an important one. Because by dislodging Internet Explorer from its dominant market position, Firefox has proven not only that open-source projects often provide better software–something to which any Linux geek will attest–but that it’s possible for a particularly well done one to become an everyday consumer application.
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Welcome to Web 3.0

This year, as we convene the seventh edition of D: All Things Digital, we think something major is happening at the intersection of tech and media, and we think it deserves its own new hyped-up name: Web 3.0. Yes, folks, we are declaring the Web 2.0 era over, because, well, when you run conferences and Web sites, you can say stuff like that.
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Welcome to Lucky D7: Still Gambling on the Digital Future

Incredibly, this is the seventh year of the D: All Things Digital conference. We feel very lucky to get here, especially in the midst of what our own site’s Digital Daily scribe, John Paczkowski, has so perfectly dubbed the “econalypse.” Ironically, Walt Mossberg and I planned to launch the very first conference in the middle of the last major downturn for tech, in 2001. But, in the carnage of the Web 1.0 meltdown, we actually held off for two years, with our first D gathering taking place in 2003.
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Welcome to Lucky D7: Still Gambling on the Digital Future

Incredibly, this is the seventh year of the D: All Things Digital conference. We feel very lucky to get here, especially in the midst of what our own site’s Digital Daily scribe, John Paczkowski, has so perfectly dubbed the “econalypse.” Ironically, Walt Mossberg and I planned to launch the very first conference in the middle of the last major downturn for tech, in 2001. But, in the carnage of the Web 1.0 meltdown, we actually held off for two years, with our first D gathering taking place in 2003. Well, we’re still going–making the same long-term bet that the digital revolution will keep rolling as we did at D1. Here’s our lineup for D7.
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Mozilla's CEO John Lilly Speaks!