Voices

Google in $17 Million Settlement Over Improper Web Tracking

Google has agreed to pay $17 million to settle allegations brought by 37 states and the District of Columbia that it placed unauthorized tracking “cookies” on Web browsers in 2011 and 2012.

Five Key Features of Mavericks, Appleā€™s New OS for Macs

Upgrading your Mac to the Mavericks operating system? Here’s what you need to know.
Mavericks Desktop

News Byte

Blogging Startup Medium Opens to All

Medium, the blogging startup created by Twitter co-founder Evan Williams, announced on Friday that it is now open for all to use. Newcomers are required to sign in with a Twitter account, and can only post from Chrome, Firefox and Safari browsers.

Apple’s New Mavericks OS X: Free. That’s Right, Free.

As first revealed at WWDC back in June, Apple’s new operating system for Macs improves the Safari browser and focuses on maximizing battery life.
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Apple’s Safari Made Up Most Mobile Browser Traffic in Q2

Safari wins, but not in all cases.
safari_apple

A Valuable Tool for Web Browsing

Curiyo lets online readers learn more about a word or phrase in a story without ever leaving the Web page. It’s a valuable and easy-to-use addition to Web browsing.
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Evernote’s Phil Libin and Flipboard’s Mike McCue on iOS 7 and OS X Mavericks

The two prominent Apple developers said there was a lot to like in Apple’s new software, but they will need more information to figure out just what it will mean for their products.
Phil Libin at WWDC 2013

Safari Still Winning the Mobile Browser War

Apple’s Safari captured 61.79 percent of all mobile browser Web traffic in March, according to Net Applications.
safari_apple

Voices

How and Why We Track: Confessions of an Ad “Tracking” Company

By most estimates, the first online ad appeared roughly 20 years ago. As a technology, cookies have been used for almost as long.
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News Byte

Mozilla to Block Third-Party Cookies in Firefox

The Mozilla Foundation, makers of the popular Firefox Web browser, will begin to block third-party advertising cookies by default, a move sure to upset online advertisers who rely on behavioral audience tracking to better serve online ads. The move is in line with that of Apple’s Safari, which has blocked third-party cookies for a long time, yet diverges from Google’s Chrome browser, which allows cookies of all types.

The Right Thing

Baidu Births Mobile Browser

Internet Explorer on the Upswing