Ina Fried

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Take That, Cupertino! Toshiba Flashes Insults at Apple in Teaser Site for Its Android Tablet.

Toshiba is taking it straight to the iPad in a new Web site that teases the coming arrival of its Android tablet.

On the site, Toshiba touts the features its tablet has that the iPad lacks, such as rear-facing and front-facing cameras, a replaceable battery, USB and HDMI ports.

“Sure being a wireless gadget nomad is fun,” Toshiba says on the site, “but so is sharing all the stuff you find.”

The main site includes a long Flash intro movie and an elaborate Flash-based site touting the tablet’s various features. In addition to the added cameras and ports, the device will come in five colors, Toshiba notes.

The best part, though, is how the teaser site loads on devices that can’t play Flash, such as the iPhone and iPad.

“Such a shame,” reads the headline on the non-Flash site. “Add this to the list of interesting places on the Internet you can’t see on your device. Of course, if you had a Toshiba Tablet, you would enjoy the entire Internet. Yep, Flash sites too.”

Of course, getting your hands on that tablet would also require a time machine, since Toshiba’s slate won’t hit the market until spring. And by the time the Toshiba slate does arrive, it is likely to have plenty of Android competition, including products such as Motorola’s Xoom and LG’s T-Mobile G-Slate. Plus, those two tablets also come with both Wi-Fi and support for a cellular connection to the Internet.

It is also likely to have to compete against Research In Motion’s PlayBook as well as potentially a webOS tablet from HP and maybe even a new iPad that packs some of the very same features Toshiba now touts as advantages.


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Just as the atom bomb was the weapon that was supposed to render war obsolete, the Internet seems like capitalism’s ultimate feat of self-destructive genius, an economic doomsday device rendering it impossible for anyone to ever make a profit off anything again. It’s especially hopeless for those whose work is easily digitized and accessed free of charge.

— Author Tim Kreider on not getting paid for one’s work